Episode #2608 -
Nitrates - Part 1
Don Roseboom of the Geological Survey; Marcia Willhite, the Illinois EPA Deputy Director; Jean Payne, the Illinois Fertilizer & Chemical Association President; and Dan Schaefer of the Illinois Council on Best Management Practices will discuss the problem of nitrate levels in Illinois waterways. A recent study of farm runoff in Bloomington revealed there was more nitrate content than expected in stream ways. Nitrates result from nutrients like nitrogen that farmers apply to crops. High nitrate levels may cause problems for drinking water in Illinois, but also cause hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. The nitrates cause high levels of algal growth in the gulf, which when it dies sinks to the floor of the gulf and deprives shell fish of oxygen
Original Air Date(s): 10/31/2013
Guest Information
  • Dan Schaefer - Illinois Council on Best Management Practices
  • Don Roseboom - USGS Illinois Water Science Center Hydrologist
  • Jean Payne - President of the Illinois Fertilizer & Chemical Association
  • Marcia Willhite - Illinois EPA Chief, Bureau of Water
Dan Schaefer - Illinois Council on Best Management Practices
Dan Schaefer - Illinois Council on Best Management Practices
Don Roseboom - USGS Illinois Water Science Center Hydrologist
Don Roseboom - USGS Illinois Water Science Center Hydrologist
Jean Payne - President of the Illinois Fertilizer & Chemical Association
Jean Payne - President of the Illinois Fertilizer & Chemical Association
Marcia Willhite - Illinois EPA Chief, Bureau of Water
Marcia Willhite - Illinois EPA Chief, Bureau of Water
Kickapoo Creek
Kickapoo Creek
Floods in the Mississippi watershed cause sediment and nutrients to flow into the Gulf of Mexico.
Floods in the Mississippi watershed cause sediment and nutrients to flow into the Gulf of Mexico.
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